Keynote Speakers - Abstracts and Bios

 

Professor Ying-Dar Lin

Keynote Topic: Towards Coding-Representation-Analysis Framework for Multimedia Big Data

Abstract:

The second wave of cloud computing, named network cloudification, in the forms of SDN (Software Defined Networking), NFV (Network Function Virtualization), and 5G-MEC (Mobile Edge Computing), is to centralize and virtualize networking into data centers. It enables operators to offer NaaS (Networking as a Service) with much lower CAPEX and OPEX with larger flexibility because devices become simpler, the number of administrators is less, and service orchestration is easier. It turns parts of communications currently done in hardware into computing done in software. However, the host of these data centers would not be Google-like super data centers as they are too far away from subscribers. The latency requirement of 10ms and 1ms decentralizes cloud computing down to edge and fog computing with CORD (central offices re-architected as data centers) and cellular base stations for SDN-NFV and 5G-MEC, respectively. In this talk, we first argue why, where and when SDN, NFV, 5G-MEC would prevail, and then illustrate how to make it happen with OpenFlow, SC (Service Chaining), NSH (Network Service header), etc. Then we examine how latency requirement dominates this virtualization game by listing key questions to answer in resource allocation in the architectures of SDN, NFV, and 5G-MEC. Their answers are mostly unknown now but would benefit the architects and developers of OpenFlow switches, SDN controllers, SDN-NFV apps, NFV data centers, MEC-enabled base stations, and operator’s infrastructure in general.

Bio:

Ying-Dar Lin is a Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at National Chiao Tung University (NCTU) in Taiwan. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from UCLA in 1993. He served as the CEO of Telecom Technology Center in Taipei during 2010-2011 and a visiting scholar at Cisco Systems in San Jose during 2007–2008. Since 2002, he has been the founder and director of Network Benchmarking Lab (NBL, www.nbl.org.tw), which reviews network products with real traffic. NBL became a certified test lab of the Open Networking Foundation (ONF) since July 2014. He also cofounded L7 Networks Inc. in 2002, which was later acquired by D-Link Corp. His research interests include design, analysis, implementation, and benchmarking of network protocols and algorithms, quality of services, network security, deep packet inspection, wireless communications, embedded hardware/software co-design, and recently network cloudification. His work on “multi-hop cellular” was the first along this line, and has been cited over 800 times and standardized into IEEE 802.11s, IEEE 802.15.5, WiMAX IEEE 802.16j, and 3GPP LTE-Advanced. He is an IEEE Fellow (class of 2013), an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer (2014-2017), and a Research Associate of ONF. He has served or is serving on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Computers, IEEE Transactions on Sustainable Computing, IEEE Computer (Associate Editor-in-Chief), IEEE Network, IEEE Communications Magazine - Network Testing Series, IEEE Wireless Communications, IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials, IEEE Communications Letters, Computer Communications, Computer Networks, Journal of Network and Computer Applications, and IEICE Transactions on Communications. He is currently the Editor-of-Chief of IEEE Communications Surveys and Tutorials. He has guest-edited several Special Issues in IEEE journals and magazines, co-chaired symposia at Globecom’13 and ICC’15, and chairs workshops and symposia in Globecom’18 and Globecom’19. He published a textbook, Computer Networks: An Open Source Approach (www.mhhe.com/lin), with Ren-Hung Hwang and Fred Baker (McGraw-Hill, 2011). It is the first text that interleaves open source implementation examples with protocol design descriptions to bridge the gap between design and implementation.

 

Professor Rudolf Mathar

Keynote Topic: TBA

Abstract:

TBA

Bio:

Rudolf Mathar received the Ph.D. degree from RWTH Aachen University in 1981. He held lecturer positions with Augsburg University and the European Business School. In 1989, he joined the Faculty of Natural Sciences, RWTH Aachen University. He has held the International IBM Chair in computer science with Brussels Free University in 1999. In 2004, he was appointed as the Head of the Institute for Theoretical Information Technology with the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, RWTH Aachen University. Since 1994, he has held visiting professor positions with The University of Melbourne, Canterbury University, Christchurch, and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore. In 2002, he was a recipient of the prestigious Vodafone Innovation Award. In 2010, he was elected member of the NRW Academy of Sciences and Arts. He is co-founder of two spin-off enterprises. From 2011 to 2014, he served as the Dean of the Faculty of Electrical and Engineering and Information Technology. In 2012, he was elected as Speaker of the Board of Deans, RWTH Aachen University. Since 2014, he has been serving as Vice-rector for research and structure with RWTH Aachen University. His research interests include information theory, mobile communication systems, particularly optimization, resource allocation, and access control. Recently he has initiated projects in the area of compressed sensing and data science.

 

Professor Jean Armstrong

Keynote Topic: Visible light communications: a solution to the spectrum crunch?

Abstract:

Standard white lighting LEDs unlike conventional forms of lighting can be modulated at megahertz frequencies. As a result every LED light has the potential to transmit high speed data. This is the basis of important new forms of visible light communications (VLC) and visible light positioning (VLP). This talk will outline the key findings of our research on VLC and VLP and that of other leading groups around the world. The huge potential of this emerging field to deliver very high speed data and accurate indoor positioning will be explained. The many research challenges that still have to be overcome to turn this potential into reality will be outlined. VLC, particularly one form called LiFi, has attracted a lot of media attention. This talk will separate the facts from the hype.

Bio:

Jean Armstrong is a Professor at Monash University, Australia, where she leads a research group working on topics including optical wireless, radio frequency and optical fiber communications. She has published numerous papers including over seventy on aspects of OFDM for wireless and optical communications and has six commercialized patents. Jean Armstrong was born in Scotland and before emigrating to Australia worked as a Design Engineer at Hewlett-Packard Ltd., Scotland. In Australia she has held a range of academic positions at Monash University, the University of Melbourne and La Trobe University. During her career she has received numerous awards including a Carolyn Haslett Memorial Scholarship, a Zonta Amelia Earhart Fellowship, the Peter Doherty prize for the best commercialization opportunity in Australia (joint winner), induction into the Victorian Honour Roll of Women, the 2014 IEEE Communications Society Best Tutorial Paper Award and most recently the IET Mountbatten Medal. She is a Fellow of the IEEE and IEAust. She was a Member of the Australian Research Council (ARC) Research Evaluation Committee in the most recent evaluation round and has previously served on the ARC College of Experts. Professor Armstrong is actively involved in IEEE Communications Society activities including editing (IEEE Communications Letters, IEEE Transactions on Communications, Journal of Optical Communications Networks), reviewing and conference organization.